10 Most Common Questions People Ask Before Moving to California

If you’ve been thinking about moving to California, then this article is for you! This blog post will answer 10 of the most common questions people ask before they move. We’ll talk about what it’s like living in California and if it’s worth the high cost of living. If your question isn’t answered here, please leave a comment below and we’ll try our best to help you out!

1. What do I need if I want to move to California?

Ask yourself what California means to you. Is it Los Angeles and Hollywood? Silicon Valley and the Tech Industry? The Vineyards of Paso Robles? Palm Desert or Big Bear Lake in the mountains with a skiing/snowboarding destination just two hours away?

Then travel out to visit California for six months, see if you have any friends there that could help show you around, find a place to rent for six months or so and work remotely beforehand–the majority of people won’t be willing to relocate themselves without having some form of assurance that they’ll be able to find work in their new location as well as finding somewhere affordable

Think of all the factors that will go into finding a place to call home in California-the type of house or apartment you want to live in, where it’s located, how much rent will be per month etc… Once you’ve nailed down what cities or neighbourhoods are the best fit for your needs (keep in mind where jobs are), then search online for “California Apartment Listings”, “Cities near Los Angeles” or other locations that interest you. Check out neighbourhoods with their own Facebook pages too!

2. Is it worth moving to California from another US state?

California is the world’s eighth-largest economy, so the answer is pretty simple – job prospects are better than most places in America. If you can stand living on a mesa (southeast does not count), then live it up in California, there are plenty of resources and culture to keep everyone busy. The tech environment and evolving job landscape will keep pushing innovation forward; someday they’ll make LA into something livable for those without heaps of cash to blow on housing…

A lot of people move out for Hollywood – if you can stomach the smog, spend a few years here pursuing dreams! It will either break your spirit or open up creative avenues that may never have been discovered otherwise.

Benefits include fresh produce, a range of beautiful landscapes to choose from and beautifully mild winters. 

Costs include higher housing costs, as well as the high price to purchase a car with all taxes and insurance included – California, cannot sell vehicles with no tax. From the moment you enter the state, you have 20 days to register your car. (dmv.ca.gov)

There are also traffic congestions, air pollution levels that don’t meet EPA standards and earthquakes if you live in an area close to fault lines such as Southern California. If it’s education that interests you the most, then California is worth a look because there are various museums including The Getty Center which is easily accessible by public transportation.

3. What is your biggest regret moving to California?

It’s difficult to answer a question like this without seeming biased, or miserable.

Moving to California is a big lifestyle change and is more expensive as well. Too many Californians are complaining about how expensive everything is without realizing that they’re the reason it’s so expensive! The truth of the matter is that living in California doesn’t automatically make life easier or better for you.

That said, there are a lot of beautiful surroundings and state parks here if you live near an ocean or mountain range which makes for nice hikes to keep yourself sane (assuming you don’t live in LA). But yeah, I think my biggest regret would be moving away from Nevada County where I belonged back when I was born and raised in Grass Valley…in fact, this is my home now!

4. Why is moving to California alone considered a good idea?

There are many reasons it is a good idea to move to California alone, but the most important one likely has to do with your mindset. If you were single at some point in time and want to come back after a breakup, then living on your own will not only be a decision for you, but also for this person who may decide that he or she wants you back in their life.

For those who don’t want someone else nagging them about work, they need to be done around the house or other decisions they have made (such as moving away from their family), living on your own can be rewarding and the best option financially.

Some people move to California because they’re considering starting a business or because their family has already moved there and they don’t want to be too far away. In that case, moving might be a good idea.

But please note that even though income taxes are lower than in other states, property taxes are still higher – so plan on shelling out more on housing costs than you have been paying beforehand! 

5. How much money do you need to move to California?

You need to budget a lot of money because California is the most expensive state to live in. One study by Fidelity Investments found that people living in Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco spend an average of $75,000 annually on housing costs! So at least you’re getting paid well in California if you do want to move out there.

You might also need at least one month’s worth of expenses saved up for emergency expenses/job loss which should be about $2 – 3 grand depending on your living situation. One way around high costs is through having roommates (“sharing”), but it has its drawbacks as well. 

6. Is California expensive to live in (what are the costs)? 

The cost of living in California can vary depending on what you’re looking for.
In terms of rental properties, a 1-bedroom will be about $2,500 to $3,000 monthly in most major cities. A 3-bedroom property averages around $4,000 to $5,000 monthly. You can visit Census for more interesting statistics about California.

For lower prices and better value deals outside the city centre, you might consider towns such as Fresno or Sacramento which offer more affordable housing options that range from your typical suburban living to luxurious properties with beautiful views and mountain retreat-like amenities like pools and gyms.

7. Why do people move to Los Angeles?

For business, for jobs, and to make a better life for themselves.
Los Angeles is one of the top three industries in the world with almost 200.00 job openings available every day. Downtown Los Angeles is experiencing a major revitalization that will bring 25000 new jobs and $2billion a year in economic impact while strengthening connections between DTLA’s long-time residents and workers and its newcomers.

The entertainment industry is here to support creative minds. More than 200 world-class restaurants are within a 15-mile radius of downtown L.A., as well as more than 20 museums and exceptional theatre in numerous venues from Hollywood to Culver City, Santa Monica to Pasadena, Beverly Hills to Silverlake.

Unlimited opportunities for fulfilment and success await those people who call L.A., home!
Bonus reason: It’s near the beach without being too far inland so as not to get lost in bad traffic constantly or have earthquakes associated with living on the West Coast! 🙂

You can also go see snowboarders testing their skills at Mammoth Mountain 65 miles away if that’s what you’re into!

8. What is it like to live in San Diego, CA?

San Diego, CA is one of the most desirable metropolitan areas in the United States. Almost every type of neighbourhood can be found here, from neighbourhoods geared towards families to ones geared towards singles and students. Extremely good weather year-round with no harsh winter or extreme summer heatwaves make this a prime location for eco-conscious outdoorsy types.

The scenic ocean views are second to none and maintain their beauty all year round so if you like scenery there’s always something that will please your eye around any corner! There’s tons of nightlife too if you’re just looking for a big city bustling with activity where it never snows but also doesn’t get unbearably hot and humid like some other cities in California do! 

There are many good things about living in San Diego, but the three main issues with it are that it can be expensive, especially for housing; crime rates tend to be higher than elsewhere, and there is a slightly higher level of pollution.

One place which is often mentioned as “slightly less desirable” than others is Hillcrest. This area tends to have a large homeless population, drug users under freeways and bridges, and more graffiti. 

9. What is it like to live in San Jose, CA?

For those moving to San Jose, California, the Bay Area is a great metropolis boasting beautiful scenery and mild weather. The cost of living in California is more expensive than elsewhere in the United States and many people live fairly close together so things can get noisy.

San Jose faces Silicon Valley’s suburbs which has created a booming environment with flourishing industries. The airport features flights across the world while mass transportation nears perfection with public transportation systems that are on schedule 90% of the time and ridiculously well-funded compared to most cities.
San Jose offers diverse prospective with company headquarters for some major companies like Intel Corporation, Tesla Motors Inc., Nvidia Corporation, Safeway Inc., Adobe Systems Incorporated among others.

San Jose is a beautiful place to live. The beaches are just an hour away, there are plenty of parks nearby, the schools are good, and as long as you watch out for the traffic you can always find parking even downtown- which is really convenient when you have kids! San Jose also offers green open space with parks, wooded hillsides, urban farms and gardens that attract residents from all over Silicon Valley to enjoy events throughout the year.

10. What is it like to live in San Francisco CA?

The weather in San Francisco is inconsistent. It’s usually between 60-70 degrees, but can be as low as 50-60 degrees or as high as 85-90 degrees. I love the foggy mornings and rainy afternoons – and those days when the sun shines but doesn’t scorch you to a crisp.

San Francisco is full of wonderful urban villages focused on culture–Hayes Valley has shops galore; The Castro District still holds its queer roots close while being home to some of the best restaurants in the city. San Francisco is a magical place but it can also be very challenging and depressing if you don’t enjoy or fall into the stereotypical descriptions of what makes an SF person (i.e., gay, highly educated, tech-savvy).

If you are comfortable in your own skin, already have money to either live on your own or share an apartment with one other person without being bothered by roommates that suck (like I did), can get around on public transportation really well, foodies who like finding good quality tasty food at decent prices, then SF can be happy land. 


About the author: Marta Kovachek is the author of this article. She graduated from the University of Chicago with a master’s degree in Economics. Marta enjoys writing about the current economic situation and loves helping our readers to find their next "destination". From places to live to complex social and economic topics, we always enjoy Marta's work. Please contact us in case of any questions.